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Why You Hate Work

11 Jun

 

An excellent article in the New York Times with a catchy but lousy title. Should be called How to create a workplace that believes people are:

  •  Are smart.
  • Want to do good work.
  • Know what’s wrong and want to to fix it.

It’s a good read.

 

 

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Why Likeability Matters IN…….

2 Apr

 

 

This a powerful and practical WSJ article about how “likability” has a large influence in how your workplace colleagues rate and interact with you. This article is a home-run of practical advice.

 

So, my question is HOW do you get to likability and WHY? Here is one of the most watched TED videos (16,000,000+) hits and one of the top-four rated in the psychology category.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are a couple of ways that people can subscribe to this blog. Click the “+ Follow” link on the bottom right section of the site and enter your email address. This is a very easy way to receive the newest post as an email. The other way is via RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed. The RSS Feed link is located on the right sidebar of the site, directly above the Categories section. Click on “RSS – Posts” to receive your posts in their favorite RSS reader. The RSS reader that many prefer is Google Reader (http://reader.google.com). It is free, well organized, and easy to use.

 

Keep Your Dream Job, Refuse Promotion?

31 Jul

There are two problems with having your dream job. First, the reward to doing good work is getting more work.

Second, the problem with having a dream job is that it may lead to promotion.  Ever hear of the Peter Principle?  People are promoted to their level of incompetence.

Too often this promotion is to the hardest job in the workplace: First level manager.  In reality, being promoted to manager means making a career change.  Unless you realize this you will probably be in a job you don’t do well and don’t care for.

Check out: Would You Refuse a Promotion to Stay in a Job You love.

 

There are a couple of ways that people can subscribe to this blog. Click the “+ Follow” link on the bottom right section of the site and enter your email address. This is a very easy way to receive the newest post as an email. The other way is via RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed. The RSS Feed link is located on the right sidebar of the site, directly above the Categories section. Click on “RSS – Posts” to receive your posts in their favorite RSS reader. The RSS reader that many prefer is Google Reader (http://reader.google.com). It is free, well organized, and easy to use.

 

Gallup Does It Again: Make Your Job Your Love

24 Jul

 

 

The Sunday Times has a great article entitled Hone the Job You Have Into the One You Love.  Gallup has published a study of 8,000 workers who love their jobs.  People who love their jobs:

 

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  • Use their strengths every day, as do their co-workers.
  • Feel that they are an important part of their organization’s future.
  • Are surrounded by colleagues who care about their overall well-being.
  • Are excited about the future because of a leader’s enthusiasm and vision.

Consider this advice on how to begin to love your job:

            “Maybe they need more hope!”

 

There are a couple of ways that people can subscribe to this blog. Click the “+ Follow” link on the bottom right section of the site and enter your email address. This is a very easy way to receive the newest post as an email. The other way is via RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed. The RSS Feed link is located on the right sidebar of the site, directly above the Categories section. Click on “RSS – Posts” to receive your posts in their favorite RSS reader. The RSS reader that many prefer is Google Reader (http://reader.google.com). It is free, well organized, and easy to use.

 

I Quit!

26 Mar

I have watched many people quit, be fired and have worked with many who lost their jobs.  From this experiences come three major ideas:

  1. It’s always better to look for a job when you have a job.
  2. People usually leave because of a bad boss.
  3. All people remember about you is how you leave.

The NY Times had a splendid article entitled Grand Exits That Never Earn Applause.

For some idea about how important jobs can be in our lives GoTo: Work Makes Life Sweet.

There are a couple of ways that people can subscribe to this blog. Click the “+ Follow” link on the bottom right section of the site and enter your email address. This is a very easy way to receive the newest post as an email. The other way is via RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed. The RSS Feed link is located on the right sidebar of the site, directly above the Categories section. Click on “RSS – Posts” to receive your posts in their favorite RSS reader. The RSS reader that many prefer is Google Reader (http://reader.google.com). It is free, well organized, and easy to use.

Jobs: The Social Role

14 Jun

 

A fully functional person is one who has a robust repertory of social roles and knows when to use them appropriately.

 

A social role is a set of integrated knowledge and skills that are appropriate to certain social situations.

 

When people in organizations understand their co-workers social roles, i.e. jobs, they work well together.  There is compelling evidence that most internal conflict In organizations results from misunderstandings regarding  social roles (jobs).

 

We build cultures with families and organizations with jobs.  Clearly defining jobs can improve organizational effectiveness.  A recent trend is to define jobs, not as sets of tasks, but rather as sets of responsibilities.  Tasks have more of the nature of rules whereas responsibilities are clearly principles.

Most job descriptions can be reduced to three to five responsibilities.  This approach acknowledges that jobs change rapidly and invites employees to exercise their experience and common sense to preform the job.  Tasks often encourage employees to do only what is defined and nothing more.

Teaching people about jobs as social roles as small sets of responsibilities is an antidote to the entitlement disease that seems to be sweeping some organizations.


For an in-depth discussion of this issue go to Beyond Luck.

 

There are a couple of ways that people can subscribe to this blog. Click the “+ Follow” link on the bottom right section of the site and enter your email address. This is a very easy way to receive the newest post as an email. The other way is via RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed. The RSS Feed link is located on the right sidebar of the site, directly above the Categories section. Click on “RSS – Posts” to receive your posts in their favorite RSS reader. The RSS reader that many prefer is Google Reader (http://reader.google.com). It is free, well organized, and easy to use.

Jobs: More About The Social Contract

6 Jun

I don’t do that, it’s not in my job description!

This is a phrase that makes most managers shudder.  It succinctly illustrates the ongoing balance, or as some may say imbalance, between “rights” and “responsibilities.”  We are living in an age of increasing rights. 

There is a continuum here with the anchors being rights and responsibilities.  The previous social contract does not explicitly identify which are rights and which are responsibilities.

Rights are fundamental and tend to be settled by litigation whereas responsibilities are managed by cooperation.  Effective leadership and management is based on the heavy use of communication and cooperation.

Organizations that are heavy on rights, think work rules, tend to have lower productivity resulting from inflexibility.  Work environments where management is top down, heavy handed, and authoritarian tend to create the need to define rights to protect workers from such management practices. 

Entrepreneurial organizations tend to be job creators.  One reason is their focus on responsibility and flexibility.

 

For an in-depth discussion of this issue go to Beyond Luck.

Next week, the job as a social role.

 

There are a couple of ways that people can subscribe to this blog. Click the “+ Follow” link on the bottom right section of the site and enter your email address. This is a very easy way to receive the newest post as an email. The other way is via RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed. The RSS Feed link is located on the right sidebar of the site, directly above the Categories section. Click on “RSS – Posts” to receive your posts in their favorite RSS reader. The RSS reader that many prefer is Google Reader (http://reader.google.com). It is free, well organized, and easy to use.